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January 28-29, 2017: Traditional North American Healing Arts, New York City

Center for the Advancement of Therapeutic Arts
WEEKEND 5
Lewis Mehl Madrona:
Large Joints; Neck and Shoulder
Day 1: We start with ceremony and breath work.
Indigenous North American body work often moves from breath to large joints, working its way from the large to the more subtle energies. We show how to work with large joints to increase range of motion, to mobilize energy movement across the joint, and to remove restrictions. We demonstrate techniques of shaking, rocking, rolling, disrupting habitual patterns, and massaging to facilitate healing.
We incorporate listening to body stories, dialogue with the body.
Day 2: Within Indigenous body work, we frequently move toward the neck and shoulders after working with large joints.  Shoulders qualify as large joints and use all those techniques, but also as we work toward the neck, we approach more subtle energies. We work with traction of the neck, releasing tension and restrictions between the vertebrae, and mobilizing the scapulae.
We continue to incorporate body stories. We conclude with ceremony.
 

Coyote Healing Adventures: New York Shamanic Circle, New York, NY

February 11-12. 2017

To register, contact Irma StarSpirit at starspiritwoman@gmail.com or 212-533-0909
NYShamanicCircle@gmail.com.
Or visit http://www.nyshamaniccircle.org/
 
In this workshop, Barbara and Lewis will share their approach to integrating traditional, indigenous wisdom into contemporary healing work.  We present an “indigenous inspired, narrative focused, body-centered, community based, and spiritually respectful method for healing. 
 
We will share how we work to create a community in which healing can take place, how we involve the body through Cherokee bodywork and forms of energy medicine, and how we use story and drama.  We focus on stories as the building blocks of the mind, a concept drawn from the Lakota nagi, or the swarm of all the stories centered around the person’s body, that have made that person how they are.  We wish to replace diagnostic labels (like depression, anxiety, bipolar) with an understanding that some stories for how to live our lives don’t actually work as well as we wish, and sometimes we have to find new stories by which to live, in order to improve our self-world interface. 
We believe that healing comes to us from spiritual sources and that we do well to cultivate our relationships with these entities.  Coyote reminds us that healing should be fun and even sometimes silly, and that we should being too serious. 
We invite others to come play and heal with us, either as a person who is suffering or as a practitioner who’d like to see and learn what we do. 
For more information on this, see our latest book, Remapping the Mind: the Neuroscience of Self-Transformation through Story.  We plan to have something to interest body workers, psychotherapists, community organizers, storytellers, chaplains, and those who suffer.
 

February 18-19, 2017: Traditional North American Healing Arts, New York City

Center for the Advancement of Therapeutic Arts
http://www.catanyc.com/
WEEKEND 6
Lewis Mehl-Madrona and Barbara Mainguy:
Face and Cranium, Ankles and Feet; Telling Healing Stories
Day 1: Ceremony.
Next we move upward and downward, since it is common for two therapists to work simultaneously on face and cranium at the one end and ankles and feet at the other. Indigenous technique uses techniques similar to craniosacral therapy, though with perhaps more pressure. Techniques exist for moving the cranial bones and realigning them. Ankles also qualify as large joints, but move toward more subtle energies with the feet, which can be massaged on multiple levels, in ways that resemble reflexology. 
We continue to incorporate what has been learned earlier.
 Day 2: Telling Healing Stories
Traditional people have always told stories to facilitate healing, and the Indigenous North Americans were no exception. We explore how to choose and tell stories that inspire healing for those with whom we work. These stories can be traditional, can come from the culture of the person with whom we work, or can be contemporary cultural tales from the popular media.
We end with ceremony.
 
 March 18-19, 2017: Traditional North American Healing Arts, New York City
Center for the Advancement of Therapeutic Arts
http://www.catanyc.com/
WEEKEND 7
Lewis Mehl Madrona and Barbara Mainguy:
Abdominal Work, Back Work; Meridians and Points
Day 1: We begin with ceremony.
Next we move toward working with the abdomen and back, using techniques very reminiscent of visceral osteopathy for the abdomen. We bring people’s awareness to the areas of discomfort within their abdomen, especially fascial, and work toward release of energy in these tissues. We follow the path of the colon around the abdomen, improving peristalsis. We then work on the back with massage of para-spinal muscles, release of restrictions between vertebrae, and increasing general relaxation and range of motion.
Day 2: Indigenous Americans, namely the Cherokee, knew energy meridians and worked with points along these meridians. They also practiced a form of acupuncture. We demystify the energy meridians, showing how readily they can be identified with ordinary energy medicine techniques and how readily apparent points are when we “run” the meridian. We discuss the massage of points and how this assists the removal of restrictions to the flow of energy and facilitates healing.
We end with ceremony.
 
April 8-9, 2017: Traditional North American Healing Arts, New York City
Center for the Advancement of Therapeutic Arts
http://www.catanyc.com/
WEEKEND 8
Joseph Schmidlin:
Working with Levers and Fulcrums 
This class provides the osteopathic parallels to Indigenous North American body work approaches. We will learn how to apply and use levers and fulcrums to balance the body's tissue and the body's systems in specific and effective ways. We will learn how we can use these techniques to affect the nervous system and physiology. Levers and fulcrums are a core fundamental osteopathic principal used to treat the body.
 
May 20-21, 2017: Traditional North American Healing Arts, New York City
Center for the Advancement of Therapeutic Arts
http://www.catanyc.com/
WEEKEND 9
John Beaulieu:
Sonic Body: Sound Healing in Relation to Body Work
John will teach the use of sound energy to impact the body. Sound for healing can be applied with many instruments, such as voice, drums, gongs, flutes, etc. In this class we will learn to use tuning forks for healing, and we will also explore the science behind the use of sound for healing and the cross-cultural components. John will teach wave palpation, the concept of strain and counter-strain, and the use of crystals, using tuning forks as the primary instrument. He will also teach a way of visioning, which he learned spending time with a Hopi Elder, and we will learn how to map this into sonic body work.
 
June 10-11, 2017: Traditional North American Healing Arts, New York City
Center for the Advancement of Therapeutic Arts
http://www.catanyc.com/
WEEKEND 10:
Lewis Mehl Madrona and Barbara Mainguy:
Indigenous North American Energy Medicine; Clinic
Day 1: Ceremony.
Having covered the body, we move toward energy medicine and healing with light touch, hands above the body, and movement of energy with a variety of techniques, including blowing, sucking, feathering, crystals, drumming, rattling, smoking, and direction of intentionality. We see how the subtle energy level connects easily to the level of spiritual energies and beings. We incorporate healing stories.
Day 2: Clinic
Students perform two full sessions on people they bring to class. For all clinics, students will have designed the basic session prior to the class, based on an intake form, to address any issues.
Ceremony.
 
July 8-9, 2017: Traditional North American Healing Arts, New York City
Center for the Advancement of Therapeutic Arts
http://www.catanyc.com/
WEEKEND 11
Joseph Schmidlin:
Biodynamic in Osteopathy
In this class we will continue to explore the parallels between osteopathy and indigenous body work. We will learn to work with the biodynamic model within osteopathy. This is especially useful in cranial osteopathy, which we will explore at some length, as well guiding our treatment toward integration of the whole body as a dynamic unit of function.
 
August 5-6, 2017: Traditional North American Healing Arts, New York City
Center for the Advancement of Therapeutic Arts
http://www.catanyc.com/
WEEKEND 12
Lewis Mehl Madrona and Barbara Mainguy:
Ceremony and Body Work
Day 1: Body work can be a part of ceremony. We learn how to design and create a healing ceremony using traditional pan-Indian principles.
Day 2: We perform the ceremony that was designed by the class. Then, we show how to do healing ceremonies in which multiple people can work in harmony on one person, always respecting the other practitioners’ space, with the presence of drumming, dancing, and singing. This work fits within a broader context of healing circles and invocation of spiritual energies and spirits for healing.
 
September 16-17, 2017: Traditional North American Healing Arts, New York City
Center for the Advancement of Therapeutic Arts
http://www.catanyc.com/
WEEKEND 13
Lewis Mehl Madrona, Barbara Mainguy, Nita Renfrew, and Joseph Schmidlin: Overview of Integrated Sessions; Clinic
Day 1: Overview
We complete the course with demonstrations and opportunities to practice the work without separation into compartments. We go back and forth between demonstration and practice to allow integration of all the systems and areas we have explored. We complete with faculty review of participant practice with critique.
Day 2: Clinic: Students bring two persons with an issue, and perform two supervised, integrated sessions, using everything they have learned. They design the session prior to the class. We end with ceremony.
 
October 21-22, 2017: Traditional North American Healing Arts, New York City
Center for the Advancement of Therapeutic Arts
http://www.catanyc.com/
WEEKEND 14
Lewis Mehl-Madrona, Barbara Mainguy, and Christopher Trahan, L.Ac.
Day 1: Integrating Traditional Chinese Medicine, Psychotherapy, and Body Work
We will demonstrate how to integrate body work practice with psychotherapy and with traditional Chinese medicine. We will explore the idea of many hands on one client, and how to utilize multiple practitioners for sessions. We will explore the parallels between traditional Chinese Medicine and Indigenous North American concepts. We will see how body work can be occurring during simultaneous psychotherapy and acupuncture.
Day 2: Clinic:
Lewis Mehl-Madrona, Barbara Mainguy, Nita Renfrew, and Joseph Schmidlin.
Students bring two persons with an issue, and perform two supervised, integrated sessions, using everything they have learned. (They will have designed the basic session prior to the class, based on an intake form, to address any issues.)
End with Ceremony.